Naperville Business Lawyer Talks About Reading the Fine Print of Your Contracts

fine print, Naperville business lawyerThink about the last app you downloaded for your tablet or smartphone. When you installed the app, did your device tell you that the app needed certain permissions to run properly? It is not uncommon for mobile apps to ask for access to your device’s camera, microphone, call status, and more. While you might have looked at the permission request and approved it, logging into your new app probably prompted another question: “Do you agree to our terms and conditions?” Tapping “yes” allows you to proceed while tapping “no” renders the app effectively useless. Chances are you tapped “yes,” but you probably did not even glance at the actual terms and conditions.

As a business law attorney, I understand that the details of most contractual agreements are found in the so-called fine print. I also know that people are often inclined to skim over the fine print, believing that they already know what the contract says. Unfortunately, this even happens to business owners who rely on contracts every day. With that in mind, I was delighted to hear about a story out of Georgia where a woman won $10,000 simply for reading the fine print on an insurance policy.

It “Pays to Read”

According to various news outlets, Donelan Andrews, a schoolteacher from Georgia, recently made arrangements for a trip to London this coming fall with a few friends. As part of her preparations, she contacted a Florida-based insurance company named Squaremouth to buy a travel insurance policy under the company’s Tin Leg brand. When she reviewed her policy documents, she noticed something in the fine print. The company was running a contest to win $10,000, and to win, she simply needed to contact Squaremouth.

The policy read, “If you’ve read this far, then you are one of the very few Tin Leg customers to review all of their policy documentation.” It also included an email address to enter and said the first person to respond would win the money.

After Andrews responded and was informed that she had won, the company issued an explanation of the contest on its website. Squaremouth said that the contest was called “Pays to Read” and that it was designed to encourage customers to read their contracts thoroughly. The company doubled down on its commitment to reading by donating an additional $10,000 to a children’s literacy program in Washington, D.C. and $5,000 each to the two schools at which Andrews teaches.

Squaremouth reported that the contest had been running for just 23 hours and more than 70 policies including the additional fine print had been issued before Andrews responded. She said she plans to use her prize money on a trip to Scotland with her husband—presumably with a Tin Leg insurance policy once again.

Contract Review Attorney in DuPage County

The nature of business contracts and the language that is often used can make them difficult for the average person to understand. It is important, however, to know what you are signing before you sign it. If you have business contract questions, contact an experienced Naperville contract lawyer to get the answers you need. Call 630-756-1160 for a confidential consultation at The Gierach Law Firm today.

 

Sources:

CBS News

USA Today

Squaremouth